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Felicia is a recurring character in Dreamworks's animated shrek film series. She made her first appearance in the third film in the franchise, Shrek the third as the baby daughter of Shrek and Fiona.

Appearance

She, like her mom, has blue eyes. However, these have sometimes been seen to change colour.

Personality

Felicia loves to play with her doll, Sir Squeakles.

Biography

Shrek the Third

Fiona brings up the idea of Shrek and her starting a family. Shrek quickly dismisses it, pointing out that babies are a lot of work. As Shrek is leaving for his journey to get Artie, Fiona reveals to Shrek that she is pregnant. Shrek is shocked and has nightmares of being a father, not being able to protect them from various hazards. His relationship with his own abusive father causes him to worry that he will be the same kind of father he had. At the end of the film Fiona gives birth to them and appeared in the credits along with Donkey and Puss.

Shrek the Halls

Felicia is seen enjoying the holidays with her brothers and her parents. When her mother Fiona takes them outside in the snow, she is seen trying to catch snowflakes on her tongue.

Shrek Forever After

In this one, Felicia can talk a little and every morning wakes up her parents with her toy, Sir Squeakles.

Scared Shrekless

Felicia is seen with her brothers, playing pranks on trick or treaters on Halloween. She is seen with a large clump of hair in her mouth that she took from one of the treaters. Her mother takes them out for more pranks as their father and his friends decide to tell scary stories. She and her brothers later help their parents scare Donkey by doning a suit of armor, making him think Farquaad has come back as a ghost. The show ends with them pelting the seven dwarves with eggs.

Gallery

Wiki
DreamWorks Wiki has a collection of images and media related to Felicia.

Trivia

  • Felicia learned to talk before her brothers as she was talking in Shrek Forever After while Fergus and Farkle weren't talking until Scared Shrekless. This is a nod to a true fact in child psychology that states that young girls will learn how to talk before boys will.
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